Faculty

Building Capacity in the Bell Center

Federal stimulus funds were received by the MBL in 2009 to initially support the recruitment and/or retention of two faculty members specializing in regenerative biology to the new Bell Center.  This was achieved with the appointment of Mark Messerli and Joel Smith to the Bell Center. Messerli studies the natural mechanisms by which polarity in cells and tissues is formed in hopes of providing a foundation for repairing and rebuilding human tissues. Smith studies how the genetic “blueprint” is used to make the body parts of an animal. Since then, additional faculty members have been retained to help develop pilot research projects in the area of regenerative biology, tissue engineering, and marine genomics that will lay the foundation for this new research center at the MBL.

Marko Horb was recruited from the Clinical Research Institute of Montreal as Director of the National Xenopus Resource (NXR) in 2010 and received a scientific appointment in the Bell Center for Regenerative Biology and Tissue Engineering.  He uses Xenopus frogs to study the steps and signals that lead to development of the pancreas and other organs.

The successful recruitment of Jennifer Morgan from the University of Texas has added another extraordinary young scientist to the Bell Center.  The recipient of numerous awards, including the University of Texas Regent’s Teaching Award and the Society for Neuroscience Career Development Award, Jennifer is an accomplished neuroscientist working with NIH funding to elucidate the mechanisms of neurodegeneration and regeneration in the vertebrate central nervous system.

Adjunct appointments in the Bell Center have included William Jeffery (University of Maryland), Sid Tamm (Boston University), and Steven Zottoli (Williams College). Jeffery studies the mechanisms of eye degeneration, pigment loss, and the evolution of behavior using the cavefish and ciona models. Tamm investigates basic problems in cell biology and motility using comb jellies (ctenophores) and termite protozoa. Zottoli investigates the neuronalbasis of recovery from complete damage to spinal cords in non-mammalian vertebrates. More recently, Jane Maienschein (ASU), Manfred Laubichler (ASU) and Andrew Miller (HKUST) have joined the Bell Center with adjunct appointments. Maienschein’s research focuses on the history and philosophy of developmental and regenerative biology and Laubichler’s work largely embraces theoretical and evolutionary developmental biology, while Miller investigates the role played by calcium ions in the signal transduction pathways orchestrating embryonic development.

For a synopsis of these Bell Center faculty research highlights in 2012:

In addition to the principal investigators, the Center is staffed by an administrator, and postdoctoral scientists and research associates, graduate students, and research assistants.


Administrative Staff

Barbara Burbank, Center Research Administrator
MRC 314
7 MBL Street Woods Hole, MA 02543 USA
508-289-7700; fax. 508-289-7900
bburbank@mbl.edu


Research Staff

Scott Allen, Research Assistant
Susan Banks, Postdoctoral Scientist
Stephanie Fogerson, Research Assistant
Lori Horb, Research Assistant III
Rebecca (Thomason) Latimer, Postdoctoral Scientist
Cristy Lewis (Salanga), Research Assistant II
Li Ma, Postdoctoral Scientist

Mary Anne Mann, Research Associate
Scottie Mobley, NXR Research Assistant
Esther Pearl, Postdoctoral Scientist
Matthew Salanga, Postdoctoral Scientist
Lindsey Soll, Postdoctoral Scientist
Lynn Ware, NXR Assistant

Graduate Students

Akash Srivastava, Brown/MBL Graduate Student