November 26, 2015

MBL Study Details Impact of Genetic Defect on Nerve Cells in Parkinson’s Disease

Reconstruction of a lamprey reticulospinal synapse overlaid onto an electron micrograph of the same synapse. This image appeared on the cover of the February 1, 2015 issue of Molecular Biology of the Cell. Credit: David J. Busch and Paul A. Oliphint, University of Texas at Austin; Jennifer R. Morgan, MBL.

Contact: Diana Kenney, Marine Biological Laboratory 508-289-7139; Parkinson’s disease is a slow-progressing neurodegenerative disorder that afflicts about 4 to 6 million people worldwide, most of them over the age of 50. Its major symptoms are problems with movement: shakiness, slowness, rigidity, imbalance, and difficulty walking. There is no known cure. The causes of Parkinson’s […]

@MBL: Bill Klimm Profiled in Nature as “Unsung Hero” of Science


Sea Slug has Taken Genes from the Algae it Eats, Allowing it to Photosynthesize Like a Plant, Study Reports


Contact: Diana Kenney, Marine Biological Laboratory 508-289-7139; WOODS HOLE, Mass.—How a brilliant-green sea slug manages to live for months at a time “feeding” on sunlight, like a plant, is clarified in a recent study published in The Biological Bulletin. The authors present the first direct evidence that the emerald green sea slug’s chromosomes have […]

Happy New Year to All! And a Quick Look Back at 2014

A dividing cell imaged by 2014 Nobel Laureate Eric Betzig. The cell is in 
anaphase; image shows histones and 3D tracks of growing microtubule ends color-coded by velocity.

The MBL brimmed with news and activity in 2014, its always busy pace quickened by joint events and new programs with its affiliate, the University of Chicago. Below are just a few of many scientific, educational, and institutional highlights from an exciting year of discovery and transition. As we look forward to 2015, it’s important […]

MBL Imaging Technique Reveals Bacterial Biofilms in Colon Cancer Patients; Could Be Used as a Clinical Diagnostic Tool

Bacteria forming a mixed biofilm on colon cancer tissue. Credit: Jessica Mark Welch, Blair Rossetti, and Christine Dejea

Contact: Diana Kenney, Marine Biological Laboratory 508-289-7139; WOODS HOLE, Mass.—Since the first “catalog” of the normal bacterial makeup of the human body was published in 2012, numerous connections between illness and disturbances in the human microbiota have been found. This week, scientists report yet another: Cancerous tumors in the ascending colon (the part nearest […]

Huntington Willard Named President and Director of Marine Biological Laboratory


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Pamela Hinkle, Director of Development & External Relations, Marine Biological Laboratory 508-289-7650; Jeremy Manier, News Director, University of Chicago 773-702-8187; WOODS HOLE, MA — Huntington Willard, an innovative leader in the fields of genetics and genome biology who has built comprehensive research centers at leading institutions, has been appointed […]

Neil Shubin to Receive Prestigious Kavli Science Journalism Award for “Your Inner Fish”

Fiddler on the Roof? Northern Extension of Fiddler Crabs’ Range May be Sign of Climate Change

An egg-bearing female fiddler crab, Uca pugnax, at Plum Island, Massachusetts. Credit: A. Buselco-McKim.

  WOODS HOLE, Mass.—David Johnson was standing in a salt marsh on the northern Massachusetts coast when he saw a fiddler crab, Uca pugnax, nearly 50 miles north of its supposed natural range. The migration north of this charismatic crab with the big, waving claw may be yet another sign of climate change. Johnson, then […]

MBL Announces First Recipients of MBL-UChicago/Argonne Collaboration Awards


  The Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) has announced the first recipients of the MBL-UChicago/Argonne Collaboration Awards. These awards support innovative scientific collaborations among faculty at the MBL and UChicago/Argonne, in service of laying the foundation for long-term interactions between the institutions. Teams of at least one UChicago/Argonne and one MBL resident scientist are eligible to […]

An EZ-Pass for Fish: How a Fast-Warming Arctic Affects Migration and Survival


The Arctic grayling may look—well, just plain old gray, but for Linda Deegan it’s a “beautiful fish” for many reasons besides being tasty. The grayling is one of very few fish that spends its entire life, including the frigid winter, in Arctic Alaska. To solve the mystery of how they cope, Deegan, a senior scientist […]