Neurobiology

course_neurobiology

Course Date: June 2 – July 31, 2016

Deadline: February 1, 2016 | Apply here

2016 Syllabus & Lecture Schedule

Directors: Graeme Davis, University of California, San Francisco; Andres Maricq, The University of Utah; and Timothy A. Ryan, Weill Medical College of Cornell University

An intensive and comprehensive laboratory-oriented course in cellular and molecular neurobiology intended for predoctoral students, postdoctoral or clinical researchers, and young investigators beginning independent research careers. Limited to 14 students.

A hallmark of this course is the extensive lab work done in close collaboration with expert faculty. The course is divided into three sections: Electrophysiology, Imaging, and Molecular Neurobiology. These are taught by separate groups of faculty, usually six in each section, and with many guest lecturers. Each section begins with specific training in core laboratory techniques; students then undertake one- to two-week directed or independent projects using the methods they have learned. Didactic lectures are combined with laboratory experience in order to establish a strong conceptual foundation for each section. A typical day has 3 hours of lecture and 10 hours of lab.

Electrophysiological methods focus on patch-clamp and sharp electrode recordings, performed on neurons in a variety of preparations, including tissue culture, brain slices, isolated squid synapses, rat cochlea, or whole fish. Optical methods include calcium imaging, confocal and 2-photon microscopy, videomicroscopy, and electron microscopy. Molecular techniques emphasize the use of forward and reverse genetics in diverse systems such as Drosophila, C. elegans, zebrafish, chick embryos, and primary cells in culture. The impact of genetic manipulations are assayed by real time PCR, laser microdissection, single cell PCR, in situ hybridization, and a variety of immunotechniques in addition to incorporating electrophysiological and imaging techniques.

The goal of the course is to emphasize the strengths of a multidisciplinary approach for studying the function of the nervous system at the cellular and molecular levels.

This course is supported with funds provided by:
Promega
National Institute of Mental Health, NIH
Howard Hughes Medical Institute
The Grass Foundation
International Brain Research Organization
Genentech, Inc.

2016 Course Faculty & Lecturers:

Abrahamsson, Sara; The Rockefeller University
Aizenman, Carlos D; Brown University
Alpizar, Scott Andrew; Dartmouth College
An, Joon Yong; University of California San Francisco
Araneda, Ricardo C; University of Maryland
Ardiel, Evan Lorne; National Institutes of Health
Azpurua, Jorge; University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
Bamji, Shernaz; University of British Columbia
Bautista, Diana; Berkeley
Bean, Bruce P.; Harvard Medical School
Brose, Katja; Cell Press
Buchanan, Joann; Allen Institute for Brain Science
Cho, Christine; The Rockefeller University
Christensen, Ryan Patrick; National Institutes of Health
Costa-mattioli, Mauro; Baylor College of Medicine
Davis, Graeme W; University of California San Francisco
Deng, Rongkang; University of Maryland in College Park
Diantonio, Aaron; Washington University School of Medicine
Diaz, Elva; UC Davis School of Medicine
Eaton, Benjamin Arthur; UTHSCSA
Engerer, Peter; Technical University Munich
Gilson, Michael Christopher; University of California San Francisco
Gordus, Andrew; The Rockefeller University
Griffith, Theanne Nicole Dugger; Columbia University Medical Center
Hammarlund, Marc; Yale School of Medicine
Handler, Annie Isabel Chase; The Rockefeller University
Higley, Michael J; Yale University
Hoppa, Michael Blake; Dartmouth College
Hu, Ruilong; University of Maryland
Hujber, Edward; University of Utah
Jackson, Jesse Charles; Janelia Research Campus
Jenkins, Blair Addison; Columbia University
Jorgensen, Erik; University of Utah
Kanold, Patrick; University of Maryland
Kravitz, Ed; Harvard Medical School
Lichtman, Jeff W.; Harvard University
Lillya, Mark William; University of California Davis
Liu, Zhenyu; University of Wyoming
Logan, Mary A; OHSU
Lu, Ju; University of California Santa Cruz
Lumpkin, Ellen A; Columbia University
Mackinnon, Roderick; Rockefeller University
Maricq, Andres Villu; University of Utah
Misgeld, Thomas; Tecnical University of Munich
Mueller, Martin; University of Zurich
Nagel, Katherine I; NYU Medical School
Parrish, Jay Z; University of Washington
Peterka, Darcy; Columbia University
Pratt, Kara Geo; University of Wyoming
Purice, Maria Debora; Jungers Center for Neurosciences Research
Ruta, Vanessa; The Rockefeller University
Ryan, Timothy Aidan; Weill Cornell Medical College
Sack, Jon; University of California
Sanders, Stephan J; Stephan Sanders
Shimell, Jordan James; University of British Columbia
Shroff, Hari; National Institutes of Health
Smith, Louw Dietrich; University of California San Francisco
Speese, Sean David; OHSU-Jungers Center for Neurosciences Research
Sun, Ye; Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience
Sydlik, Sebastian; University of Zurich
Tjia, Michelle; University of California Santa Cruz
Villar, Pablo Sebastian; University of Maryland
Vu, Thien Nhut; University of Utah
Watanabe, Shigeki; Johns Hopkins University
Whippen, Jenna; University of California San Francisco
Williams, Claire; University of Washington
Yan, Long; Max Planck Florida Institute
Yang, Weijian; Columbia University
Yasuda, Ryohei; Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience
Younger, Meg A; The Rockefeller University
Zeng, Lewie; Yale University
Zuo, Yi; UC Santa Cruz