Workshop on Enabling Biological Discovery through Innovations in Imaging and Computation

Organized by:
Rudolf Oldenbourg, Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL)
Patrick La Rivière, University of Chicago, MBL Fellow
Daniel Colón-Ramos,Yale University, MBL Fellow
Hari Shroff, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, MBL Fellow

If you are interested in registering for this Workshop, please contact acrawford@mbl.edu.

Program and participant list:

Monday evening, November 26:

5:00pm
Dinner
7:00pm
Evening keynote: The synergy between new biology and new imaging tools

MBL welcome address, Speck Auditorium, Rowe Laboratory

Speakers:

  • Rafael Yuste, Professor of Biological Sciences, Director, Neuro-Technology Center, Columbia University
  • Clare Waterman, NIH Distinguished Investigator, Director, Cell Biology and Physiology Center, NHLBI, NIH
8:30pm
Reception and science speed dating
Meig’s Room, Swope Center
9:00pm-10:30pm
Science speed dating begins
Participants will rotate through the room and meet each other with brief introductions.
Tuesday, November 27:
8:30am
Building and disseminating new microscopy methods (moderator Hari Shroff)

Successful examples of working at the interface,bringing together biologists, engineers, computational scientists and biochemists for creating new imaging approaches for biological inquiry.

Speck Auditorium, Rowe Laboratory

Speakers:

  • Jan Huisken, Director, Morgridge Medical Engineering
  • Luke Lavis, HHMI Janelia Campus
  • Joerg Bewersdorf, Yale U., Cell Biology and Biomedical Engineering
  • Erik Jorgensen, U. of Utah, Dept. of Biology and HHMI investigator
10:30am
Computation for generating image data and their analysis (moderator Patrick LaRivière)

Defining the computational challenges that must be solved to realize the potential of the data flood.

Speck Auditorium, Rowe Laboratory

Speakers:

  • Laura Waller, UC Berkeley, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
  • Gaudenz Danuser, UT Southwestern Medical Center
  • Kevin Eliceiri, Director, LOCI, U. of Wisconsin, Madison
12:30pm
Poster session (lunch + 1 hour)

Invited trainees will be asked to bring a poster about their research, highlighting the interdisciplinary aspects.

Swope Dining Facility, 2nd Floor, Swope Center

2:30pm
Centers for interdisciplinary collaborations and training (moderator Daniel Colón-Ramos)

Creating the infrastructure that enables interdisciplinary collaboration and training.

Speck Auditorium, Rowe Laboratory

Speakers:

  • Scott Fraser, Director, Translational Imaging Center, U. of Southern California
  • Teng-Leong Chew, Director Advanced Imaging Center, HHMI Janelia Campus
  • Harshad Vishwasrao, co-Operating Director of the Advanced Imaging and Microscopy Resource, NIBIB, NIH
4:00pm
Coffee Break

Meig’s Room, Swope Center

4:30pm
Podium Discussion (moderator Nipam Patel)

Speck Auditorium, Rowe Laboratory

Nipam Patel will lead a discussion about creating Centers that 1) increase access and training opportunities in cutting-edge imaging instrumentation as it is being developed; 2) foster interdisciplinary collaboration and training between microscopists, computational imaging specialists, and biologists to advance innovation and discovery; and 3) promote the development of complementary platforms that enable unprecedented imaging across scales.

We seek specific recommendations for creating such centers, their composition in staffing and technologies, approaches for training and dissemination, and integration in the biological research community.

6:00pm
Dinner
7:00pm
Closing Reception

Closing remarks from meeting organizers.

Wednesday, November 28:
7:00am
Breakfast and check-out

Breakfast is available from 7:30-9:30 am prior to check-out.

Current Participant List:

Daniel Aharoni, UCLA
Evan Ardiel, Harvard Medical School
Ana Beiriger, University of Chicago
Yehuda Ben Shahar, Washington University in St. Louis
Kristin Branson, HHMI Janelia
James Carson, Texas Advanced Computing Center
Talon Chandler, University of Chicago
Steve Cook, Columbia University
Scott Eastman, Eli Lilly and Company
Amicia Elliott, NIMH
Cathy Galbraith, OHSU
Peyman Golshani, UCLA
Paul Goodwin, GE Healthcare
William Green, The University of Chicago
Oliver Hobert, Columbia University
Bobby Kasthuri, University of Chicago
Louis Kerr, MBL
Philippe Laissue, U. of Essex
Talley Lambert, Harvard Medical School
William Lange, WHOI
Carolyn Larabell, UCSF
Jose Lasalde, U. of Puerto Rico
Jacqueline Leung, Indiana University Bloomington
Zhuohe Liu, Rice University
Paul Maddox, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
Edwin McCleskey, Chan Zuckerberg Initiative
Christopher Moore, Carney Institute for Brain Science
Jennifer Morgan, MBL
Kaspar Podgorskii, HHMI JFRC
Katherine Phelps, UTSW
Chrysanthe Preza, The University of Memphis
Jacob Robinson, Rice University
Blair Rossetti, Emory University
Stephen Senft, MBL
James Sharp, Carl Zeiss Microscopy LLC
Michael Shribak, MBL
Corey Smith, University of Chicago
John Stegeman, WHOI
Francois St. Pierre, Baylor College of Medicine
Jason Swedlow, U. of Dundee
Maki Tani, MBL
Tomomi Tani, MBL
Andreas Tolias, Baylor College of Medicine
Gokul Upadhyayula, Harvard Medical School
Jennifer Waters, Harvard Medical School
Eviatar Yemini, Columbia University

Keynote Speakers:

Joerg Bewersdorf, Yale U., Cell Biology and Biomedical Engineering
Teng-Leong Chew, Director Advanced Imaging Center, HHMI Janelia Campus
Gaudenz Danuser, UT Southwestern Medical Center
Kevin Eliceiri, Director, LOCI, U. of Wisconsin, Madison
Scott Fraser, Director, Translational Imaging Center, U. of Southern California
Jan Huisken, Director, Morgridge Medical Engineering
Erik Jorgensen, U. of Utah, Dept. of Biology and HHMI investigator
Luke Lavis, HHMI Janelia Campus
Nipam Patel, IncomingDirector, MBL
Harshad Vishwasrao, co-Operating Director of the Advanced Imaging and Microscopy Resource, NIBIB, NIH
Laura Waller, UC Berkeley, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Clare Waterman, NIH Distinguished Investigator, Director, Cell Biology and Physiology Center, NHLBI, NIH
Rafael Yuste, Professor of Biological Sciences, Director, Neuro-Technology Center, Columbia University

Intellectual Merit:

Background and rationale

Our ability to image live cells, organs, and whole organisms has been transformed by recent improvements in light microscopy and computational methods. These important advances have also underscored three critical needs in the neuroscience and biological community: 1) the need for team-based approaches in developing new technologies that integrate imaging across scales andincorporate methodsdrawn from microscopy, computation, and biology; 2) the need for fast, accessible, and responsive deployment of technological innovations that maximize impact to the community; 3) the need for related training opportunities at the interface of biology, physics, and engineering. These unmet needs have arguably limited the impact of innovations in microscopy and computational imaging on the biological sciences.

In our survey of previous imaging workshops, we have identified four workshops supported by NSF, which addressed the need for developing, acquiring, or sharing instrumentation among the research community. Of these, two recent workshops (in 2013 and 2014) focused on new technologies for mapping and noninvasive imaging of the brain. In February 2018 the HHMI Janelia Research campus hosted a workshop on “Frontiers in Microscopy Technologies and Strategies for Bioimaging Centers Network”, aimed primarily at directors of imaging core facilities who seek to adopt new technologies. Missing among these workshops we surveyed is a conference dedicated to bringing together investigators who seek to foster interdisciplinary collaborations for developing, disseminating, and training in new imaging technologies for biology.

The purpose of this workshop is to convene interdisciplinary experts and trainees and brainstorm innovative and integrated approaches that create a positive feedback loop between instrument developers, computational experts, and biologists to transform the way technologies are developed and deployed.The workshop and its concrete outcomes will help identify the course of actions needed for making interdisciplinary research and training more effective in biological imaging, possibly including the creation of regional and national centers for innovation, dissemination, and training in biological imaging. Specifically, the workshop will be focused on discussing approaches that 1) increase access and training opportunities in cutting-edge imaging instrumentation as it is being developed; 2) foster interdisciplinary collaboration and training between microscopists, computational imaging specialists, and biologists to advance innovation and discovery; and 3) promote the development of complementary platforms that enable unprecedented imaging across scales.

The workshop will address key questions about creating, disseminating, and training in new microscope instrumentation while also defining the computational challenges that must be solved to realize the potential of the data flood. The workshop will examine the premise that key advances in this field will arise from collaborations between members of different disciplines and institutions who can convene and collaborate in places that support development and dissemination of new technologies.

Workshop structure and organization

The workshop is organized by a team of researchers who have collaborated in the past across different disciplines and institutions. Their expertise lies in biology (Daniel Colón-Ramos, Yale, MBL), optical imaging (Hari Shroff, NIH; Rudolf Oldenbourg, MBL), and computational imaging (Patrick La Riviere, University of Chicago, MBL). The organizers are also involved in training users and developers in new microscopy techniques through their home institutions and participation in MBL courses.

The workshop will bring together key players, who work at the interface between biology, engineering, physics, and computation to advance imaging for biological discovery. The invitees were selected for their contributions to transforming the microscope from an observational to a measurement tool that now produces vast amounts of data with the potential to provide new windows into the molecular structures and physiology of cells, organs, and whole organisms. Key to the rapid development is the close collaboration between creative colleagues from different disciplines, who are willing to act, learn,and train together for advancing our understanding of life in health and disease. We will encourage each senior participant to invite one trainee in their care to attend the workshop

The 2-day workshop is structured around 3 themes: 1) Building and disseminating new microscopy methods; 2) Computation for generating image data and their analysis; 3) Creating the infrastructure that enables interdisciplinary collaboration and training.

The Workshop is to be held at MBLon November 26-28, 2018. The logistical organization of the workshop will be coordinated by Alison Crawford, who is Director of Strategic Initiatives at the Marine Biological Laboratory (acrawford@mbl.edu).

Broader Impacts:

Expected concrete outcomes

The immediate outcome of this workshop will be a white paper, to be published in a biology journal, that will identify the needs and opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration and training in developing new imaging technologies and their effective integration and dissemination into biological research. The medium-term outcome will be the creation of guidelines in establishing the infrastructure that can meet these needs.

Broader impact on scientific communities

The workshop and its concrete outcomes will help identify the course of actions needed for making interdisciplinary research and training more effective in biological imaging, possibly including the creation of regional and national centers for innovation, dissemination, and training in biological imaging. Such centers would create new training opportunities for students and more senior colleagues from different disciplines, who wish to work at the interface and bridge scientific disciplines.

Activities for trainees

Invited trainees will be asked to bring a poster about their research, highlighting the interdisciplinary aspects. Posters will be displayed on Tuesday and attendees will be able to view and discuss the work during lunch and the hour that follows it.

On Tuesday morning, a moderated discussion is planned about what it is like to work at the interface of several disciplines. On Tuesday afternoon, a moderated Podium Discussion will include perspectives from trainees to help trigger questions and raised issues that were not addressed earlier in the day.

Efforts in broadening participation

The workshop will be broadly advertised to the research community and will be open for registration to everybody who is willing to pay their own way. The list of invitees reflects an outreach to underrepresented groups and diverse institutions, including the University of Puerto Rico, and local colleges, including Wheaton College and Bridgewater University.Discussions at the workshop will include ways for smaller and less resourced institutions to gain access to advanced imaging.

Additional information on MBL’s Imaging Innovation Initiative.