New Grant Application Submission Tips for Success Videos

Getting ready to apply for a grant and don’t know where to start? Set yourself up for success with tips from the experts at NIH. Quickly learn how to access application forms, ensure your application is a good fit for an announcement, and make an important final check of your application after submitting with new videos from the Office of Extramural Research (OER).

Check out these helpful quick tip videos on the How to Apply – Video Tutorials page to help you avoid common mistakes and position yourself for success:

 

Original post on October 12, 2018 by

Notice of Increases to the Simplified Acquisition and Micro-purchase Thresholds by the Office of Management and Budget

Notice Number: NOT-OD-18-219

Key Dates
Release Date:   August 28, 2018

Related Announcements
None

Issued by
National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Purpose

The purpose of this notice is to notify the extramural research community that on June 20, 2018, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a memorandum raising the threshold for micro-purchases under Federal financial assistance awards to $10,000, and the threshold for simplified acquisitions to $250,000 for all recipients. Further, the memo implements an approval process for certain institutions that wish to request micro-purchase thresholds higher than $10,000. These updates are being made in accordance with statutory changes set forth in the National Defense Authorization Acts (NDAA) for Fiscal Years 2017 (PL 114-328) and 2018 (PL 115-91).

As directed by OMB, NIH is updating its policy to reflect the new thresholds. This change is effective immediately for all NIH recipients. If purchases were made using the higher thresholds prior to this notice, NIH will support the charges in accordance with the OMB memo.

Revisions to the Federal Acquisition Regulation at 48 C.F.R. Subpart 2.1 and the Uniform Guidance, 2 C.F.R. 200, are forthcoming.

Inquiries

Please direct all inquiries to:

NIH Division of Grants Policy
Office of Policy for Extramural Research Administration
Telephone: 301-435-0949
Email: grantspolicy@nih.gov

NIH: Frequently Asked Questions

In part D of the NIH F-RPPR (participants), should we report time worked for the final budget period or time worked for the final budget period + the no cost extension period?

In the NIH Final RPPR you should report on the individuals that worked on the project during the last budget period minus any approved no-cost extensions. You can find this and more in the RPPR FAQs.

 

original post by NIH Staff 7/5/18

NSF Proposal and Award Policy Newsletters

NSF Proposal and Award Policy Newsletters:

This newsletter is produced by the Policy Office in the Division of Institution and Award Support at the National Science Foundation to provide information about upcoming changes and clarifications to policies and procedures that affect how you prepare and submit proposals and manage NSF awards.

This latest edition is particularly helpful!  You can view it here.

Previous editions are also available:

December 2017 NSF Newsletter 4

September 2017 NSF Newsletter 3

June 2017 NSF Newsletter 2

March 2017 NSF Newsletter 1

Principal Investigators, Delegate!

All you need is another Commons user with the right role. Learn how!

original post by NIH Staff 3/12/2018

NSF: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) for Public Access

Click here to see NSF FAQ’s for Public Access updated Program Announcements & Information NSF 18-041 which replaces NSF 17-060

Two New “All About Grants” Podcasts: 2018 Appendix Policy Changes, and Why You’re Encouraged to Submit Your Application Early

NIH’s Office of Extramural Research brings you two new “All About Grants”  podcasts to ring in the new year. In “Why it’s so Important to Submit Applications Early” (mp3transcript), Dr. Cathie Cooper, director of the Division of Receipt and Referral in the NIH’s Center for Scientific Review, talks about the importance of submitting application early due to changes in NIH’s policies and application forms for 2018.

In “Changes to the NIH Appendix Policy for 2018” (mp3transcript), Dr. Cooper joins us again to talk about the NIH appendix policy and new limits on what can be included as appendices.

All About Grants podcast episodes are produced by the NIH Office of Extramural Research, and designed for investigators, fellows, students, research administrators, and others just curious about the application and award process. The podcast features NIH staff members who talk about the ins and outs of NIH funding, and provide insights on grant topics from those who live and breathe the information. Listen to more episodes via the All About Grants podcast pagethrough iTunes, or by using our RSS feed in your podcast app of choice.

 

originally posted by NIH on 12/28/17

2017 Year in Review: Grants.gov Federal Grant Highlights

With 2017 in the rearview mirror, Grants.gov pauses to look back on what was a significant year for federal grants. With important developments and growth in the grants community in 2017, this post takes note of key points worth remembering and helpful resources, not just from Grants.gov, but from some of you in the grants community.

rearview mirror and Grants.gov logo

#1 – Get Your (DATA) Act Together

This would not be a real grants ‘year in review’ for 2017 without starting with the Digital Accountability and Transparency Act (DATA Act). Coordinating across all federal award-making agencies and the diverse applicant communities to standardize and improve the quality and transparency of federal financial data? That’s big.

If you are completely unfamiliar with the DATA Act, welcome to the party—start with this basic update. You should also do a web search for training and updates about the DATA Act to hear from a variety of stakeholders on what it means for the grant community.

To get you thinking about possibilities in the future, HHS’ Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Office of Grants and Acquisitions Policy and Accountability (OGAPA), Andrea Brandon, posed this question at the DATA Transparency conference in September this year, “Do we need [nonfederal entities] to actually complete an SF-424 or do we just need structured data sets that come through a particular portal?”

#2 – Not Taken for Granted

Over $700 billion in grants and cooperative agreements were awarded in FY 2017. The DATA Act gets another nod here, which led to the new beta USAspending.gov to improve the quality and transparency of federal spending data. If you are interested in more spending data, check out the USAspending.gov Agency Profiles and Spending Map.

As a note, that number does include Medicare and Medicaid funding in the form of formula grants, but there were thousands of discretionary funding opportunities posted on Grants.gov for which many of you applied for—and it is a competitive process.

Of course, we need to mention at least one grant-writing tip here—do not eliminate yourself from the competition by not checking that you have followed all the basic requirements.

#3 – Grants Community Growth with More Events and Training Resources

Anecdotally, 2017 certainly seemed like one of the most prolific with regard to grant events and training resources available to the community.

While Grants.gov could just link to their own training videos, events calendar, or other resources (YSWIDT?), they want to recognize your awesome contributions to the community.

#GrantChat – Talk with fellow grant professionals on a range of topics relevant to your work. This is a great way to hear tips, share resources, and get to know your professional peers online.

Resources By You, For You – Here’s a sampling of grant resources for you to review: eCivis blog, Grant Professionals Association Resource Center, Grant Training Center, Grant Writer’s Blog, GrantSpace by Foundation Center, GrantStation Insights blog, Learn Peak Grantmaking, Management Concepts Applying for Federal Grants & Cooperative Agreements, National Grants Management Association Annual Grants Training, NIH Regional Seminar & Extramural Nexus blog, SmartGrants Blog, the bmtconsulting blog, The Grant Plant Resources, Thompson Grants Federal Grants Forum, or check out our Where to Find Free Online Resources for Federal Grant Applicants Part 1 and Part 2 for more.

#4 – Did the 2017 Grants.gov Plan Happen?

Last January, Grants.gov shared high-level plans for 2017, and they are happy to say that they were able to stick to these plans. Admittedly, #1 and #3 from last year’s plan go hand-in-hand, but here’s a link to Grants.gov Workspace resources just in case you haven’t read about it yet.

They are proud to have received awards confirming the direction of the program. FedHealthIT 100 awarded John Enggren, the Grants.gov Program Manager, for developing Workspace and his efforts of “driving change and advancement in the Federal Health Information Technology and Consulting Market.” In June 2017, Enggren and the program also received recognition at the 2017 AFFIRM Leadership Awards Celebration for Workspace.

Original post by Grants.gov dated 1/2/2018

A Basic Approach to Submitting Your First Workspace Application

Basic approach to Workspace is the best path for organizations with 1-2 registered Grants.gov users

Let’s flesh out an applicant scenario that some new Workspace users will face:

You are about to begin your first federal grant application using Grants.gov Workspace. For years, you (and sometimes one other colleague) applied using the old Legacy PDF Application Package.

You traded a package of PDF forms back and forth until you were ready to cross your fingers and click Submit. It was never easy, but you had grown comfortable with the painstaking process. Now, with the upcoming retirement of the Legacy PDF, you are trying to learn the new Grants.gov method for applying.

Below you will find an example approach for applying with Workspace that keeps to the familiar workflow as much as possible.

In the coming weeks, we will also share more complex workflows that take advantage of Grants.gov Workspace’s new applicant features.

Steps to Follow

  1. Make sure at least one person at your organization is registered and has the AOR role

      2.Design an internal application workflow that ensures each PDF form is downloaded from the workspace and shared with unregistered team members

Use the interactive workflow graphic to understand, at a high level, the process you will need to follow to complete your application. Not all steps in the workflow will apply to teams of only one or two applicants.

  1. Log in and create your workspace from the Package tab on the View Grant Opportunity page

The user with the AOR role, or any other user with the Manage Workspace role, may create the workspace. The user who creates the workspace will automatically become the Workspace Owner.

  1. Download individual PDF forms and, if applicable, distribute them to unregistered team members

Unregistered applicants on your team will be restricted to completing only the individual PDF forms that are shared with them. Without a Grants.gov account, they will not be able to access the online workspace.

  1. Upload all completed forms to the workspace and submit the application

Workspace performs some error checks on form fields automatically when uploaded. Other checks are run by clicking the Check Application button within the workspace. At any point after all required forms are in the “Passed” status, the user with the AOR role may click the Submit button.

  1. Track your application and download the entire submission for your offline record-keeping

After submitting, you can track your application using the tracking number you receive from Grants.gov. You may also want to download a copy of your submitted application for your offline recordkeeping. We recommend tracking and downloading your application via the Details tab of your workspace.

Did you find this helpful? A more in-depth version of this scenario can be found here, along with related help articles and training videos.

originally posted Posted on December 4, 2017

NIH to Publicly Post Project Outcomes

The NINDS DTR wanted to increase awareness of a NIH policy change that will impact their grantees.  The NIH has announced that NIH will be publicly posting project outcomes on NIH’s Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tool (RePORTER).  Please review the NIH Guide Notice NOT-OD-18-103 for complete details. This applies to any outcomes submitted on or after Oct. 1, 2017. These outcomes are entered by principal investigators in the Outcomes portion (Section I) of the interim and final Research Performance Progress Reports (RPPRs) for their grants in eRA Commons.

 It is important that all PIs when writing the Outcomes portion (Section I) ensure that it is:

  • Written for the general public in clear and concise language
  • Suitable for dissemination to the general public
  • Does not include proprietary, confidential information or trade secrets
  • Not more than half a page

To help the research community understand what is an acceptable report, NIH has a specific example posted.(https://grants.nih.gov/grants/rppr/sample_project_outcomes_RPPR.htm )