Publications


Below are TIDE Project publications from the primary literature coupled with a theses and dissertations.  Superscripts indicate scientific stage of author when manuscript submitted.  U=undergraduate student, G=graduate student, PB=post-bachelor’s, pre-graduate student, PD=post-doctoral scientist.

 

  1. PDMitwally, H.M. and J.W. Fleeger. 2014. Long-term nutrient enrichment alters nematode trophic structure and body size in Spartina alterniflora marsh. Marine Ecology (P30)
  2. GVieillard, A. Effects of fertilization on tidal creek and tidal flat nitrogen cycling. Master’s Thesis. Boston University. (T16)
  3. GSullivan, H. 2014. The effects of nitrate fertilization on the photosynthetic performance of the salt marsh cordgrass, Spartina alterniflora. Master’s Thesis. (T15)
  4. Fagherazzi, S. 2013. The ephemeral life of a salt marshGeology.  41: 943-944.  (P29)
  5. GLockfield, K., J.W. Fleeger, and L.A. Deegan. 2013.  Mummichog Fundulus heteroclitus responses to long-term, whole-ecosystem nutrient enrichment.  Marine Ecology Progress Series, 492:211-222 (P28)
  6. GFreidman, K. 2013. The effects of nitrate fertilization on the physiology of a common salt marsh cordgrass species, Spartina alterniflora. Masters Thesis. Clark University. (T14)
  7. UBooth, H.S. 2013. Does Chronic Nutrient Enrichment Result in a Trophic Bottleneck in a Salt Marsh?  Honors Thesis.  Brown University. (T13)
  8. Mitwally H. M. and J. W. Fleeger. 2013. Long-term nutrient enrichment elicits a weak density response by saltmarsh meiofauna Hydrobiologia, 713: 97-114. (P27)
  9. PDPascal, P.-Y. and J. W. Fleeger. 2013. Diverse dietary responses by saltmarsh consumers to chronic nutrient enrichment. Estuaries and Coasts, In press. (P26)
  10. Johnson, D.S. and UM.I. Short. 2013. Chronic nutrient enrichment increases the density and biomass of the mudsnail Nassarius obsoletus.  Estuaries and Coasts 36: 28-35. (P25)
  11. PDPascal, P-Y, J.W. Fleeger, H.T.S. Boschker, H.M. Mitwally, and D.S. Johnson. 2013. Response of benthic food web to short-term and long-term nutrient enrichment in saltmarsh mudflats.  Marine Ecology Progress Series 474:27-41. (P24)
  12. Fagherazzi S., D.M. FitzGerald D.M., R.W Fulweiler, PDZ. Hughes, P.L. Wiberg, K.J. McGlathery, J.T. Morris, T.J. Tolhurst, L.A. Deegan, and D.S. Johnson. 2013. Ecogeomorphology of Salt Marshes, In: John F. Shroder (ed.). Treatise on Geomorphology, Volume 12. pp. 180-200. (P23)
  13. Fagherazzi S., D.M. FitzGerald D.M., R.W Fulweiler, PDZ. Hughes, P.L. Wiberg, K.J. McGlathery, J.T. Morris, T.J. Tolhurst, L.A. Deegan, and D.S. Johnson. 2013. Ecogeomorphology of Tidal Flats, In: John F. Shroder (ed.). Treatise on Geomorphology, Volume 12. pp. 201-220. (P22)
  14. Fagherazzi, S., M.L. Kirwan, S.M. Mudd, G.R. Guntenspergen, S. Temmerman, A. D’Alpaos, J. van de Koppel, J.M. Rybczyk, E. Reyes, C. Craft, J. Clough. 2012.  Numerical models of salt marsh evolution: Ecologlical, geomorphic and climatic factors.  Reviews of Geophysics, 50 (P21)
  15. Deegan, L.A., D.S. Johnson, R.S. Warren, J. Fleeger, S. Fagherazzi, and W. Wollheim. Coastal eutrophication as a driver of salt marsh loss.  Nature 490:388-392. (P20)
    -Featured in 
    Nature New and Views The big picture of marsh loss by Steve Pennings
  16. URitter, A.  2012. Effect of eutrophication on benthic microalgae.  Senior Thesis.  Middlebury College. (T12)
  17. GVieillard, A.M. and R.W. Fulweiler. 2012.  Impacts of long-term fertilization on salt marsh tidal creek benthic nutrient and N2 gas fluxes.  Marine Ecology Progress Series  471:11-22. (P19)
  18. UChaisson, C.  2012.  Factors influencing stem density in creekbank Spartina alterniflora in a New England salt marsh.  Honors Thesis.  Connecticut College. (T11)
  19. UShort, M.I.  2012.  Nutrient effects on Spartina patens decomposition dynamics in a New England salt marsh.  Honors Thesis.  Brown University. (T10)
  20. UVieillard, A., R.W. Fulweiler, PDZ. Hughes, and GJ. Carey. 2011.  The ebb and flood of silica: Quantifying dissolved and biogenic silica fluxes from a temperate salt marsh. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science 95: 415-423. (P18)
  21. Galván, K., J.W. Fleeger, B. Peterson, D. Drake, L.A.Deegan, and PDD.S. Johnson. 2011.  Natural stable isotopes and dual isotope tracer additions help to resolve resources supporting a saltmarsh food web.  Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology 410: 1-11. (P17)
  22. Bowen, J.L., B.B. Ward, H.G. Morrison, J.E. Hobbie, I. Valiela, L.A. Deegan and M. L. Sogin. 2011. Microbial community composition in sediments resists perturbation by nutrient enrichment. The ISME (International Society for Microbial Ecology) Journal 5:1540–1548. (P16)
  23. GLockfield, K. 2011.  Population-level responses of the mummichog,Fundulus heteroclitus, to chronic nutrient enrichment in a New England salt marsh. Master’s Thesis.  Louisiana State University. Baton Rouge, LA. (T9)
  24. PDJohnson, D.S. 2011.  High marsh invertebrates are susceptible to eutrophication. Marine Ecology Progress Series 438:142-152. (P15)
  25. GMariotti, G and S. Faherazzi. 2010.  A numerical model for the coupled long-term evolution of salt marsh tidal flats.  Journal of Geophysical Research-Earth Science, DOI: 10.1029/2009JF001326 (P14)
  26. UGrubaugh, C.  2010. Top-down and bottom-up of benthic macroinvertebrate communities in salt marsh ditches.  Senior Thesis.  Middlebury College. (T8)
  27. GKoop-Jakobsen, K., and A. E. Giblin.  2010. The effect of increased nitrate loading on nitrate reduction via denitrification and DNRA in salt marsh sediments. Limnology and Oceanography. 55:789-802. (P13)
  28. PDBowen, J. L., B. C. Crump, L. A. Deegan, and J. E. Hobbie. 2009. Salt marsh sediment bacteria: their distribution and response to external nitrogen inputs. The ISME (International Society for Microbial Ecology) Journal. 3:924-934. (P12)
  29. PDBowen, J. L., B. C. Crump, L. A. Deegan, and J. E. Hobbie. 2009. Increased supply of ambient nitrogen has minimal effect on salt marsh bacterial production. Limnology and Oceanography.  54:713-722. (P11)
  30. PDDrake, D. C., B. J. Peterson, GK. A. Galván, L. A. Deegan, J. W. Fleeger, C. Hopkinson, PBJ. M. Johnson, GK. Koop-Jakobsen, GL. E. Lemay, GErin E. Miller, PBChristian Picard, R. Scott Warren. 2009. Salt marsh ecosystem biogeochemical responses to nutrient enrichment: A paired 15N tracer study. Ecology 90:2535-2546. (P10)
  31. GJohnson, D. S. and J. W. Fleeger  2009. Weak response of saltmarsh infauna to ecosystem-wide nutrient enrichment and fish predator reduction: A four-year study. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology.  373:35-44. (P9)
  32. GJohnson, D. S., J. W. Fleeger and L. A. Deegan. 2009. Large-scale manipulations reveal top-down and bottom-up controls interact to alter habitat utilization by saltmarsh fauna. Marine Ecology Progress Series 377:33-41. (P8)
  33. GKoop-Jacobsen, K. and A. Giblin. 2009. Anammox in tidal marsh sediments: The role of salinity, nitrogen loading, and marsh vegetation. Estuaries and Coasts 32:238–245. (P7)
  34. PDDrake, D. C., L. A. Deegan, PDL. A. Harris, GE. E. Miller, B. J. Peterson, and R. S. Warren. 2008. Plant N dynamics in fertilized and natural New England saltmarshes: A paired 15N tracer study. Marine Ecology Progress Series. 354:35-46. (P7)
  35. Fleeger, J.W., GD.S. Johnson, GK.A. Galván and L.A. Deegan. 2008. Top-down and bottom-up control of infauna varies across the saltmarsh landscape. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology 357: 20-34. (P5)
  36. GGalván K.A.  2008. The diet of saltmarsh consumers. Ph.D. Dissertation.  Louisiana State University.  Baton Rouge, LA.  238 pp. (T6)
  37. GGalván K.A., Fleeger J.W., Fry B. 2008. Stable isotope addition reveals dietary importance of phytoplankton and benthic microalgae to saltmarsh infauna. Marine Ecology Progress Series 359:37-49. (P4)
  38. GJohnson, D.S.  2008. Trophic control of saltmarsh invertebrates.  Ph.D. Dissertation.  Louisiana State University.  Baton Rouge, LA.  167 pp. (T5)
  39. GJohnson, D. S., and PBB. J. Jessen. 2008. Do spur-throated grasshoppers,Melanoplus spp. (Orthoptera: Acrididae), exert top-down control on smooth cordgrass Spartina alterniflora in northern New England? Estuaries and Coasts 31:912-919. (P3)
  40. Deegan, L. A., PDJ.L. Bowen, PDD. Drake, J.W. Fleeger, C.T. Friedrichs, GK. A. Galván, J. E. Hobbie, C. Hopkinson, PBJ.M. Johnson, GD.S. Johnson, GL.E. Lemay, GE. Miller, B.J. Peterson, PBC. Picard, S. Sheldon, J. Vallino, and R.S. Warren.  2007. Susceptibility of salt marshes to nutrient enrichment and predator removal. Ecological Applications 17(5):S42-S63. (P2)
  41. GJohnson, D. S., J. W. Fleeger, GK. A. Galván, and E. B. Moser. 2007. Worm holes and their space-time continuum: Spatial and temporal variability of macroinfaunal annelids in a northern New England salt marsh. Estuaries and Coasts 30(2):226-237. (P1)
  42. GLeMay, L.E., 2007. The impact of drainage ditches on salt marsh flow patterns, sedimentation and morphology: Rowley River, Massachusetts. MS Thesis, School of Marine Science, College of William and Mary, Gloucester Point, VA, 239 pp. (T5)
  43. ULuciano, K.E., 2007. Investigation into the relationship between morphology and tidal flux in ditched and non-ditched salt marsh creek systems, Rowley Massachusetts. Senior Thesis, Department of Geology, College of William and Mary, Gloucester Point, VA, 71 pp. (T4)
  44. GMiller, E., 2006. Experimental nutrient enrichment of a New England Saltmarsh: Plant productivity and community composition responses. Master’s Thesis. Connecticut College, New London, CT. 37 pp. (T3)
  45. URandall, J., 2005.The effects of nutrient enrichment and predator removal on algal communities in a New England Marsh. Senior Thesis, Department of Biology, Middlebury College, Middlebury VT. (T2)
  46. ULee, W. M., 2004. Factors affecting sedimentation patterns of a tidal marsh in Plum Island Sound Estuary, Massachusetts. Senior Thesis, Department of Geology, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA. (T1)