Team Explores Salt Marsh Restoration to Offset Global Warming

November 8th, 2017 @   - 

Salt marshes have been flooded by inland freshwater along nearly a third of the U.S. Atlantic coast, due to diversions by dams, dikes, and other human constructs. This hurts more than the natural biodiversity of a saltwater system. As salt marshes freshen, they emit more and more methane—a powerful greenhouse gas.

“A molecule of methane is 30 times more potent as a greenhouse gas than a molecule of carbon dioxide,” says Jim Tang, an associate scientist in the MBL Ecosystems Center.

Tang and his colleagues at the Bringing Wetlands to Market (BWM) project are laying out a framework for returning salt marshes to their natural salinity by removing various tidal restrictions. In a recently published study, they modeled the rate of methane emissions from freshened marshes and suggested mitigations to the problem.

by Stephanie M. McPherson

More>>

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Comments are closed.


Contact Us

The Ecosystems Center

7 MBL Street
Woods Hole, MA 02543-1015
508-289-7496

Find Us

Physical location of offices:

CV Starr Environmental Laboratory
11 Albatross Street
Woods Hole, MA

Support Us

Help us continue the important work of understanding the health of the earth’s natural systems. Support the Ecosystems Center with a gift to the MBL Annual Fund!