Endowed Scholarships

MBL courses attract a diverse population of graduate students, postdoctoral researchers and undergraduate students from hundreds of institutions around the world. Students are empowered to pursue science at the very highest levels and work directly with outstanding faculty pursuing novel experiments that test new ideas and foster a globe-spanning network of collaboration. Admission to MBL courses is need-blind and the MBL relies on both scholarship endowments and expendable sources to provide aid.

To discuss naming a scholarship, please email Development@mbl.edu.

THE BRUCE AND BETTY ALBERTS ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP IN PHYSIOLOGY

Bruce M. Alberts, PhD, is the Chancellor’s Leadership Chair in Biochemistry and Biophysics for Science and Education at the University of California, San Francisco, to which he returned after serving two six-year terms as the president of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). A prominent biochemist with a strong commitment to the improvement of science and mathematics education, Dr. Alberts, was awarded the National Medal of Science by President Barack Obama in 2014 and the 2016 Lasker-Koshland Special Achievement Award in Medical Science. Dr. Alberts is an alumnus and former faculty member of the Physiology course and a former member of the MBL Science Council.

Betty Alberts served as president of the San Francisco PTA which led to the formation of the Science & Health Education Partnership at UCSF, co-founded by Dr. Alberts and David Ramsay, former UCSF vice chancellor for academic affairs.

JOHN AND ELISABETH BUCK ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP

John B. Buck, PhD, (1912-2005) was the head of the Laboratory of Physical Biology at The National Institutes of Health. From 1933 until the end of his life, he conducted his research during the summer at the MBL while instructing in the Laboratory’s famous Invertebrate course in 1942-1944 and again in 1957-1959. Dr. Buck worked under Professor S.O. Mast and married his daughter Elisabeth, who continued as his wife and research companion throughout his life. Dr. Buck achieved preeminence as a biologist for his studies in bioluminescence. His thesis, published in 1937, reported on periodicity and diurnal rhythm, plainly showing what must have been one of the earliest examples of a circadian rhythm involving bioluminescence. Dr. Buck served as an MBL Corporation member and a trustee of the Laboratory.

C. LALOR BURDICK ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP

C. Lalor Burdick, PhD, (1892-1989) was a DuPont chemist who played a key role in changing abortion procedures in the United States. He introduced the vacuum aspirator used to perform abortions to major teaching hospitals and medical schools. Physicians have said the technique reduced the need for transfusions and the chance of infection during abortions.

MAX M. BURGER ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP IN EMBRYOLOGY

Max M. Burger, MD, PhD, (1933-2019) was a founding Member of Princeton University’s Biochemical Sciences Department and a Professor for Biochemistry at the University of Basel. He was member of the MBL Corporation, a Whitman Scientist, and a course faculty member of the Embryology course at the MBL. Dr. Burger’s research focused on the biochemistry of the cell surface in both tumor cells and marine sponges, specifically for the function of glycans and glycoproteins. He discovered that silicic acid elements in the cell membrane are capable of making normal and malignant cells variable.

GARY N. CALKINS MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

Gary N. Calkins, PhD, (1869-1943) a leading figure in the study of single-cell life forms during the first half of the twentieth century, was a biologist at the New York State Cancer Laboratory and was active for many years at the MBL as clerk of the MBL Corporation. His research contributed greatly to our understanding of various unicellular organisms, publishing The Protozoa in 1901, the earliest English-language book on the subject. Much of his research was on the life cycle of various protozoa, though he also defined several new species and made numerous contributions to the taxonomy of amoebae and ciliates.

PATRICIA A. CASE ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP

James F. Case, PhD, (1926-2013) pursued a long and illustrious career in biological science, mainly in the field of marine bioluminescence. He served as a trustee of the MBL, a member of the MBL Corporation, and was an alumnus of the Embryology course. Dr. Case established this fund in his wife’s name.

WILLIAM D. COHEN ENDOWED FUND FOR UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION

William “Bill” D. Cohen, PhD, (1938-2008) was a cell biologist and professor of biological sciences at Hunter College and the Graduate School of the City University of New York. He first came to Woods Hole in the summer of 1962 as a graduate student in the lab of Tay Hayashi, and then for over 30 consecutive years beginning in the mid-1970s. Dr. Cohen was a faculty member of the Physiology course at the MBL as well as a visiting investigator. With his special devotion to undergraduate education and his enthusiasm for summer research at the MBL, Dr. Cohen participated in developing summer research opportunities for undergraduates at the MBL and designed and oversaw an undergraduate research training facility.

EDWIN GRANT CONKLIN MEMORIAL FUND

Edwin Grant Conklin, PhD, (1863-1952) was a professor of biology at Princeton University and taught the MBL’s Embryology course for many years. Dr. Conklin visited the MBL every summer from the 1890s through the 1930s, served as a trustee for many years, and was a co-editor of The Biological Bulletin. Experimenting in the field of invertebrate embryology, he studied the egg cell and traced the formation of organs to their origins in the egg cell and embryo. Dr. Conklin also investigated the physical mechanism of cell division and became an authority on human evolution.

BERNARD DAVIS ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP

Bernard “Bernie” D. Davis, MD, (1916-1994) a prominent figure in microbiology and in national science policy, was a professor at Harvard Medical School and a faculty member of the Physiology and Microbial Ecology courses at the MBL. He devised the penicillin enrichment method for obtaining nutritional mutants of Escherichia coli and established himself as a major figure in the years when E. coli and its viruses came to dominate studies in cellular and biochemistry genetics. His most important contribution was a series of papers which worked out the biosynthesis of the aromatic amino acids.

WILLIAM F. AND IRENE C. DILLER MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

William “Bill” F. Diller, Jr., PhD, (1902-1986) professor emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania, was a well-known ciliatologist, biologist and microscopist. He was a student in the Physiology and Embryology courses at the MBL.

Irene C. Diller, PhD, (1900-1987) was a cell cytologist at the Institute for Cancer Research in Philadelphia and a major contributor to the understanding of the role of bacteria in cancer.

THE MAC V. EDDS JR. ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP

Mac Vincent Edds, Jr., PhD, (1917-1975) was a professor in the department of biology at Brown University, a former director of the Embryology course at the MBL, and an MBL Trustee. Perhaps his most important breakthrough was the discovery of collateral nerve growth. By cutting one nerve in a doubly innervated muscle, he noted that the remaining axons sprouted collateral fibers which reinnervated the nerveless regions of the muscle. It was the profound implications of this observation which attracted so much attention to the problem of nerve-muscle specificity, a problem still yet to be fully explained.

ANN OSTERHOUT EDISON/THEODORE MILLER EDISON AND OLGA OSTERHOUT SEARS/HAROLD BRIGHT SEARS ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP

Ann Osterhout Edison (1902-1993) was a pharmacist at the Merck Institute for Therapeutic Research as well as the laboratories of Thomas A. Edison, Inc. She was the daughter-in-law of Thomas Alva Edison, the inventor. Theodore Miller Edison (1898-1992) was an American businessman, inventor, and environmentalist. He was the youngest child of inventor Thomas Edison, and founder of Calibron Industries, Inc. Olga Osterhout Sears (1905-1992) and Harold “Harry” Bright Sears (1903-1997) worked in the retail clothing business.Winthrop John Vanleuven Osterhout (1871-1964), father of Ann and Olga, was a Harvard University botanist who spent many summers at the MBL as a visiting investigator and long-serving trustee.

THE GERALD D. AND RUTH L. FISCHBACH ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP           

Gerald “Gerry” D. Fischbach, MD, is a distinguished scientist and fellow at the Simons Foundation and an MBL Trustee Emeritus, visiting investigator, and former faculty member of the Neurobiology course at the MBL. Throughout his career, Dr. Fischbach has studied the formation and maintenance of synapses, the contacts between nerve cells and their targets through which information is transferred in the nervous system. He pioneered the use of nerve cell cultures to study the electrophysiology, morphology and biochemistry of developing nerve-muscle and inter-neuronal synapses.

Ruth L. Fischbach, PhD, is a professor of bioethics and the director of the Center for Bioethics at Columbia University. Her research interests and publications focus on decisions around the end of life, autonomy of the elderly, communication between patients and healthcare professionals, pain assessment and management, and the experiences of research participants, particularly as they relate to privacy and informed consent. Her current work focuses on research ethics and contemporary issues in bioethics including: neuroethics, stem cell research, and advances in assisted reproductive technology.

THOMAS B. GRAVE AND ELIZABETH F. GRAVE SCHOLARSHIP

Thomas B. Grave, PhD, (1900-1989) a retired chemist, served in the Army during World War II and was assigned to a chemical warfare unit to develop an antidote to mustard gas. Throughout his life he worked at Rockefeller University, E.R. Squibb, Evans Research and Development Corp, and Rossmoor Leisure World.

(Mary) Elizabeth F. Grave (1908-1999) was a librarian in New York who enjoyed bridge and gardening.

Dr. Grave’s father was Caswell Grave, PhD, (1870-1944), former director of the zoology department and professor at the Washington University at St. Louis noted for his work in cytology and biology and culture of the oyster. He was a student, instructor, investigator, and trustee of the MBL. 

DANIEL S. GROSCH ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP

Daniel S. Grosch, PhD, (1918-1992) was a professor emeritus at North Carolina State University. He was a faculty member in the genetics department for 39 years, retiring in 1985. Before that he was a parasitologist in the Army Medical Corps and, during World War II, an instructor in the Navy Flight Program at the University of Pennsylvania. He did extensive study and research on radiation-induced sterility and work on research projects.

ALINE D. GROSS SCHOLARSHIP

Aline D. Gross (1956-1980) was a graduate student in biochemistry at Cornell University who died of cancer at the age of 24. Despite her diagnosis, she became an honor student at Yale University, a promising biochemist, an athlete, and a writer of growing sophistication and power. Her father, Paul R. Gross is University Professor of Life Sciences, emeritus, at the University of Virginia. He was vice president and provost of the university, director of the MBL, and is an author of books, monographs, and articles on science, education, and basic research in molecular biology.

HIBBITT ENDOWED EDUCATION FUND    

H. David Hibbitt began his career in engineering with Associated Electrical Industries of Manchester, England, working on the design of large steam turbines for electrical power generation. He later worked for the Marc Analysis Research Corporation, where he was responsible for the development of the Marc finite element program. He founded Hibbitt, Karlsson and Sorensen (now ABAQUS), and began the design and development of the ABAQUS program. He is a trustee of the MBL.

Susan Hibbitt is the daughter of former MBL scientists John and Elisabeth Buck and granddaughter of former MBL scientist Samuel Ottmar “S.O.” Mast. The Hibbitts have also established the John and Elisabeth Buck and S.O. Mast scholarships.

WILLIAM RANDOLPH HEARST EDUCATION ENDOWMENT

The Hearst Foundations are national philanthropic resources for organizations working in the fields of culture, education, health, and social services. The Hearst Foundations identify and fund outstanding nonprofits to ensure that people of all backgrounds in the United States have the opportunity to build healthy, productive, and inspiring lives.

KURT AND RHODA ISSELBACHER ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP

Kurt T. Isselbacher, MD, (1925-2019) was a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, leader of the Massachusetts General Hospital Gastrointestinal Unit, and founding director of the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center. He served as a member of the MBL Corporation, the MBL Board of Trustees, and was named trustee emeritus. Dr. Isselbacher’s main scientific contributions stemmed from his studies of the biochemical and metabolic underpinnings of gastrointestinal diseases.

HOLGER AND FRIEDERUN JANNASCH ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP IN MICROBIAL DIVERSITY

Holger W. Jannasch, PhD, (1927-1998) was a marine microbiologist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, former MBL Trustee and member of the MBL Corporation, and a director and faculty member of the Microbial Ecology and Marine Ecology courses at the MBL. His main interests were the growth of microorganisms in the sea, the existence of microbes at the low temperature and high pressure of the ocean depths, and the microbial processes taking place at hydrothermal vents on the ocean floor. It was Dr. Jannasch who discovered hydrothermal vents.

JANE C. KALTENBACH-TOWNSEND ENDOWMENT FOR UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH

Jane C. Kaltenbach-Townsend, PhD, (1922-2017) retired as biology Professor Emerita in the Department of Biological Sciences at Mount Holyoke College. She continued to teach and publish well after retirement into her nineties. She spent decades at the MBL, bringing several undergraduate and graduate students with her each summer.

BENJAMIN KAMINER ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP IN PHYSIOLOGY

Benjamin “Ben” Kaminer, MD, (1923-2003) was chairman of the Physiology Department at Boston University School of Medicine and an independent investigator at the MBL for several years. After moving to the Boston area, his involvement with the MBL continued. Returning each summer as a Visiting Investigator, he studied calcium-regulated processes in the sea urchin. He served as an MBL Trustee and member of the Corporation.

RICHARD G. KESSEL ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP

Richard G. Kessel, PhD, (1931-2013) was a professor at the University of Iowa and an alumnus of the MBL’s Embryology course. Dr. Kessel published more than 120 research and review articles and is the author of five books on subjects including histology, scanning electron microscopy, and specialized techniques related to cell, tissue, and organ microscopy.

ARTHUR KLORFEIN SCHOLARSHIP AND FELLOWSHIP

Arthur Klorfein (1918-1976) was a Manhattan lawyer, sportfisherman and fishing tournament organizer.

EDWIN S. LINTON SCHOLARSHIP

Edwin S. Linton, PhD, (1855-1939) was emeritus professor of biology at Washington and Jefferson College and an alumnus of the Zoology course at the MBL. Dr. Linton was a pioneer in the study of parasitic worms and won several international honors for his discoveries. He wrote voluminously on his studies, including zoological papers and bulletins of the United States Fish Commission and the United States Natural Museum.

JACQUES LOEB FOUNDERS’ SCHOLARSHIP

Jacques Loeb, MD, (1859-1924) was a University of Chicago professor when he founded the Physiology course at the MBL in 1892 and directed for several years. His pioneering research into the development of fertilized sea urchin eggs led to the discovery of artificial parthenogenesis by hypertonic solution, perhaps his most famous contribution to experimental biology. He served as an MBL trustee from 1897 to his death, and from 1910 on he headed a satellite summer laboratory of the Rockefeller University at the MBL as a member of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research.

S.O. MAST SCHOLARSHIP SCHOLARSHIP

Samuel Ottmar Mast, PhD, (1871-1947) was a professor of Zoology at Johns Hopkins University who spent many summers at the MBL, first attending in 1907. He was elected a member of the MBL Corporation and later (1936-1942) served as a trustee. Dr. Mast published Light and the Behavior of Organisms in 1911, and most of his research centered on the reactions of lower organisms to stimuli, especially light.

MASTROIANNI-SEGAL-KOIDE SCHOLARSHIP

Luigi “Lu” Mastroianni, Jr., MD, (1925-2008) was a professor emeritus of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center and a former member of the MBL Corporation. Dr. Mastroianni earned world-wide acclaim for research in the field of female hormone action, the development of in vitro fertilization and scientific leads for new methods of contraception.

Sheldon “Shelly” J. Segal, PhD, (1926-2009) was a Distinguished Scientist at the Population Council and founding board member of the Center for Reproductive Rights. He directed research that led to the development of groundbreaking contraceptives, including the copper-bearing IUDs and implant contraceptives. At the MBL, he served as chairman of the MBL Board of Trustees and helped lead the MBL’s first capital campaign. He was also a visiting investigator and a faculty member of the Microbiology course at the MBL. Drs. Segal and Mastroianni played an important role in the founding of the MBL Fertilization and Gamete Physiology (FERGAP) research training program, the forerunner to the current Frontiers in Reproduction (FIR) program.

Samuel “Sab” S. Koide, PhD, (1923-2021) retired as senior scientist of biomedical research at the Population Council where he also served as assistant director in 2003 after 38 years on staff. He held faculty positions at the Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, the Rockefeller University and Cornell Medical School. He was on the medical staff at Northwestern University Hospital in Chicago and the Memorial Hospital in New York. He was a visiting investigator for over 20 years at the MBL, a member of the MBL Corporation, and a faculty member of the Microbiology course.

THE MBL ASSOCIATES ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP

The MBL Associates, now named the Friends of the MBL, are ambassadors, acting as a link between the MBL and the public, planning and promoting community lectures and events such as the MBL Falmouth Forum, or serving as tour guides and exhibit center docents to help others “Discover the MBL.”

MBL PIONEERS SCHOLARSHIP

An endowed scholarship to recognize the pioneering investigators of the MBL.

THE MIKE MCCLURE SCHOLARSHIP FOR FRONTIERS IN REPRODUCTION

Michael “Mike” McClure, PhD, (1941-2018) worked as Branch Chief at the National Institute of Child Health and Development (NICHD), National Institute of Health during his illustrious career. Among his professional achievements was the creation of the Frontiers in Reproduction (FIR) course at the MBL in 1997. He remained involved in the course throughout his life and made many contributions to the reproductive sciences.

LORUS J. AND MARGERY J. MILNE SCHOLARSHIP

Lorus Johnson Milne, PhD, (1910-1987) was a professor of biology and entomologist at the University of New Hampshire. He and his wife Margery published extensively as coauthors. Of his 57 published books, his best-known entomology work in print is The National Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Insects and Spiders which he coauthored with Margery. He served as a member of the MBL Corporation for several decades.

FRANK MORRELL ENDOWED MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

Frank Morrell, MD, (1926-1997) was a professor of neurology at Rush Medical College and a member of the MBL Corporation. His laboratory investigations were fundamental to understanding the physiology and the treatment of epilepsy.

THE MOUNTAIN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

Isabel Morgan Mountain (1911-1996) was an American virologist at Johns Hopkins University whose work led to the identification of three distinct serotypes of poliovirus, all of which must be incorporated for a vaccine to provide complete immunity from poliomyelitis. Her work was a key link in the chain of progress toward a killed-virus polio vaccine, one that culminated in the approval of Jonas Salk’s vaccine for general use in 1955. This scholarship memorializes her son. Her parents were Thomas Hunt Morgan and Lilian Vaughan Sampson.

NS&B ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIP

Founded by the faculty and students of the Neural Systems and Behavior (NS&B) course.

PFIZER INC. ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP

Pfizer Inc. is an American multinational pharmaceutical corporation. Pfizer develops and produces medicines and vaccines for a wide range of medical disciplines, including immunology, oncology, cardiology, endocrinology, and neurology.

LOLA ELLIS ROBERTSON ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP

Lola Ellis Robertson (1911-2007) conducted parasitology research at New York University with Dr. Horace Stunkard and participated in the Invertebrate Zoology course at the MBL. She became a special education teacher in the Evansville, IL, public school system and continued her work with Dr. Stunkard in the summers at the MBL for over 50 years before retiring.

FLORENCE C. ROSE AND S. MERYL ROSE ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP

S. Meryl Rose, PhD, (1912-1995) was professor of experimental embryology and university professor of biology at Tulane University Medical School. Dr. Rose spent many summers in Woods Hole conducting research at the MBL. He was director of the Embryology course at the MBL and served two terms as a trustee. Dr. Rose conducted innovative zoological research with a major emphasis on the regeneration of limbs of amphibians.

Florence Rose (1902-2005) taught in the Englewood, NJ, public schools and at Columbia University and Smith College. She also worked with her husband in his laboratory at the University of Illinois Zoology Department. She continued as a research associate with her husband at Wesleyan University and Tulane Medical School. Beginning in the 1930s, they spent summers at the MBL with their graduate students, studying growth, differentiation and regeneration in marine organisms and higher vertebrates. They published many scientific papers together.

THE RUTH SAGER SCHOLARSHIP

Ruth Sager, PhD, (1918-1997) was chief of cancer genetics at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and a professor at Harvard Medical School - the first woman to earn the title - where she was an acknowledged expert on suppressor genes and their relation to breast cancer. In the 1950s and 1960s, she pioneered the field of cytoplasmic genetics by discovering transmission of genetic traits through chloroplast DNA, the first known example of genetics not involving the cell nucleus. She served as a member of the MBL Corporation and a faculty member of the Physiology, Microbiology, and Microbial Ecology courses.

ABIGAIL SALYERS ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP IN MICROBIAL DIVERSITY

Abigail Salyers, PhD, (1942-2013) was a research scientist, author and professor at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Her research focused on bacteria in the intestinal tract contributing to better understanding of antibiotic resistance and mobile genetic elements. She served as a director of the Microbial Diversity course at the MBL in the 1990s and was a member of the MBL Corporation.

THE HOWARD A. SCHNEIDERMAN ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP

Howard A. Schneiderman, PhD, (1927-1990) was the chief scientist and senior vice-president for research and development at the Monsanto Corporation and an alumnus of the Physiology and Invertebrate Zoology courses at the MBL. He conducted research in developmental biology and genetics, including growth control, congenital malformations, and cancer.

THE MILTON L. SHIFMAN ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP

Established by Robert S. Shifman and the Milton L. Shifman Scholarship Trust at the request of Board Chairman Sheldon “Shelly” J. Segal to form a partnership between the MBL and the E.E. Just Program at Darmouth College. 

THE MOSHE SHILO MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

Moshe Shilo, PhD, (1920-1990) was a microbiologist working in the field of aquatic microbiology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem who was influential in the development of modern microbial ecology. His contributions to science in Israel included some significant contributions to Israel’s scientific infrastructure. He was a Grass Fellow and a faculty member of the Microbial Ecology course at the MBL.

THE BILL AND PHOEBE SPECK FUND

William T. Speck, MD, is Professor of Clinical Pediatrics at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, a former director of the MBL, and a current trustee and emeritus member of the MBL Society. Through his visionary leadership and management skills, the Laboratory completed a successful capital campaign, increased its endowment, and generated significant profits.

Phoebe Speck, PhD, LICSW, is a psychotherapist based on Cape Cod.

H. BURR AND SUSIE STEINBACH FELLOWSHIP

Henry “Burr” Steinbach, PhD, (1905-1981) was a professor emeritus of biology at the University of Chicago and a former director of the MBL (1966-1970). He also served as the first dean of graduate studies at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute. Dr. Steinbach specialized in the study of the generation of electricity by animal cells and the distribution of chemical salts in cells and body fluids.

Mary Eleanor “Susie” Parsons Steinbach (1908-2003) was a reporter and social case worker in her early career. She often accompanied Burr in the MBL lab and became very active in the Woods Hole community.

JANE LAZAROW STETTEN ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP

Jane Lazarow Stetten (1919-2003) enjoyed a long and productive professional career first as a biochemist and later as a technical writer and editor in the fields of experimental diabetes and cytochemistry and an information systems research analyst in the Minnesota Department of health. An avid opera, symphony, and theatergoer, she was also a long-time member of the MBL Corporation. She considered Woods Hole and the Laboratory to be her spiritual home. She spent most summers of her adult life there and enjoyed a wide circle of intimate and devoted friendships that persisted throughout her life.

MARJORIE ROLOFF STETTEN SCHOLARSHIP

Marjorie “Marney” Roloff Stetten, PhD, (1915−1983) was an American biochemist whose carbohydrate metabolism research led to the advancements in biomedical knowledge of enzymes and biosynthesis and the discovery of AICA ribonucleotide. During her career, she was an investigator at the National Institutes of Health and a research professor of experimental medicine at Rutgers Medical School. She served as a trustee of the MBL.

HORACE W. STUNKARD SCHOLARSHIP

Horace W. Stunkard, PhD (1889-1989) was chairman of the department of biology at New York University and spent most of his summers since 1914 at the MBL. His studies uncovered the underlying principles of parasitology including basic host-parasite relationships and the co-evolution of parasites and their hosts. Dr. Stunkard is best known for parasitologic studies identifying parasites of sheep and silver foxes, which led to reduced economic losses in those industries.

SURDNA FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP

The Surdna Foundation was founded in 1917 by John Emory Andrus to pursue a range of philanthropic purposes. To this day, family stewardship of the Foundation is guided by Andrus’ commitment to serving those in need.

EVA SZENT-GYÖRGYI SCHOLARSHIP

Eva M. Szent-Györgyi, PhD, (1925-1988) was a professor at Brandeis University and the wife of and collaborator of MBL faculty member and Physiology course director Andrew Szent-Györgyi. They spent 14 years in Woods Hole as members of the Institute for Muscle Research and the MBL Corporation. She contributed greatly to the study of the mechanism of regulation in muscle.

J.P. AND MADELEINE TRINKAUS ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP IN EMBRYOLOGY

John “Trink” P. Trinkaus, PhD, (1918-2003) was professor emeritus and a senior research scientist in molecular, cellular and developmental biology at Yale University. Author of the classic book Cells into Organs: The Forces that Shape the Embryo, Dr. Trinkaus has been described by the National Cancer Institute as the world’s leading expert on in vivo cell movements. Dr. Trinkaus was an alumnus of the MBL Embryology course and served as a course assistant and faculty member of the course who spent many summers in Woods Hole with his wife Madeleine Trinkaus (1924-2012).

SELMAN A. WAKSMAN ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP IN MICROBIAL DIVERSITY

Selman A. Waksman, PhD, (1888-1973) was a biochemist and microbiologist whose research into the decomposition of organisms that live in soil enabled the discovery of streptomycin and several other antibiotics. A professor of biochemistry and microbiology at Rutgers University for four decades, he discovered a number of antibiotics and introduced procedures that have led to the development of many others. The proceeds earned from the licensing of his patents funded a foundation for microbiological research, which established the Waksman Institute of Microbiology located on the Rutgers University. In 1952, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Dr. Waksman also organized a division of Marine Bacteriology at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He was appointed as a marine bacteriologist there and served as a trustee at WHOI and finally a life trustee.

STANLEY W. WATSON EDUCATION FUND

Stanley “Stan” W. Watson (1921-1995) was a scientist emeritus at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution who was instrumental in demonstrating the importance of bacteria in the marine food webs. His 1977 paper “Determination of bacterial number and biomass in the marine environment,” authored with Tom Novitsky, Helen Quinby and Frederica Valois, is one of the most cited papers in modern marine microbial ecology. He also established the Associates of Cape Cod, a major supplier to the pharmaceutical industry throughout the world. He served as a member of the MBL Corporation and a trustee of the MBL.

WILLIAM MORTON WHEELER FAMILY FOUNDER’S SCHOLARSHIP

William Morton Wheeler, PhD, (1865-1937) was an American entomologist, myrmecologist and Harvard professor. He was considered a taxonomist of the highest order and became a leading authority on the behaviors of ants and other social insects. A student of the MBL’s first director, Charles Otis Whitman, Dr. Wheeler followed Dr. Whitman’s path to the University of Chicago and subsequently the MBL where he participated in the creation of the Biological Bulletin.

THE WALTER L. WILSON ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP

Walter L. Wilson, PhD (1918-1988) was a professor in the biological sciences department at Oakland University where he played a significant role in the development of the curriculum, programs, and faculty. He was a longstanding member of the MBL Corporation.