Eugene Bell Center for Regenerative Biology and Tissue Engineering
Research in the Center is intended to elucidate the molecular, genetic and cellular mechanisms underlying the growth and replacement of highly differentiated tissues during development, physiological turnover and repair following injury.
About the Eugene Bell Center
Squid
Credit: Roger Hanlon
About Eugene Bell

The Eugene Bell Center for Regenerative Biology and Tissue Engineering is named in honor of Dr. Eugene Bell (1919 – 2007), a pioneer in the field of tissue engineering and a valued member of the Marine Biological Laboratory scientific community.

In the 1980s, Dr. Bell developed a method to grow human skin that could be grafted onto wounds of burn victims and other severely injured patients without rejection. He also devised ways to grow “skin equivalents” for blood vessels or organ tissue. His research led to what is now known as regenerative medicine.

Learn more about Dr. Bell and the Bell Center
Eugene Bell

Recent Publications

Regulation of stem cell identity by miR-200a during spinal cord regeneration. Walker SE, Sabin KZ, Gearhart MD, Yamamoto K, Echeverri K. Development. 2022 Feb. 1;149(3):dev200033. DOI: 10.1242/dev.200033

Genome and transcriptome mechanisms driving cephalopod evolutionAlbertin CB, Medina-Ruiz S, Mitros T, Schmidbauer H, Sanchez G, Wang ZY, Grimwood J, Rosenthal JJC, Ragsdale CW, Simakov O, Rokhsar DS. Nat Commun. 2022 May 4;13(1):2427. DOI: 10.1038/s41467-022-29748-w

Emergence of novel cephalopod gene regulation and expression through large-scale genome reorganization. Schmidbauer H, Kawaguchi A, Clarence T, Fu X, Hoang OP, Zimmermann B, Ritschard EA, Weissenbacher A, Foster JS, Nyholm SV, Bates PA, Albertin CB, Tanaka E, Simakov O. Nat Commun. 2022 Apr 21;13(1):2172. DOI: 10.1038/s41467-022-29694-7

Uncovering the effects of symbiosis and temperature on coral calcification. Dellaert Z, Vargas PA, La Riviere PJ, Roberson LM. Biol Bull. 2022 Feb;242(1)62-73. DOI: 10.1086/716711

Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) is a highly conserved pro-regenerative transcription factor in the vertebrate nervous system. Katz HR, Arcese AA, Bloom O, Morgan JR. Front Cell Dev Biol. 2022 Mar 8;10:824036. DOI: 10.3389/fcell.2022.824036

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